The Importance of Qualitative Research to Advance Equity in Wisconsin’s Early Education Workforce Structures (Para español desplácese hacia abajo).

by Dr. Toshiba Adams, Ph.D. 

Early education lays the foundation for a child’s lifelong developmental journey (Rigby et al., 2007). Behind the colorful learning environments are dedicated educators who shape the minds of our youngest learners. In Wisconsin, our early education landscape is richly diverse, with 12.6 percent of center-based teachers and 28 percent of family providers identifying as Black or Brown professionals (Pilarz, A. R. et al., 2021) who serve as pillars of strength and wisdom for young children, their families and the community at large. However, similar to other professions, Black and Brown early educators experience unique challenges. In this blog, I consider the nuanced landscape of Wisconsin’s early education workforce and share key lessons learned from a (2022) qualitative research study that highlights the lived experiences of a segment of this workforce who identify as Black, Indigenous, or a Person of Color (BIPOC). Based on their shared sentiments, Wisconsin’s early education workforce structures are laced with structural racism and other forms of inequities that impact Black and Brown professionals’ social, economic and political mobility; job satisfaction; retention in the field; psychological well-being; and interactions with children and families. 

To better understand their experiences we first needed to hear their stories. Storytelling is a concept that is rooted in African tradition and has historically been used to preserve the culture, beliefs and knowledge of African people. Befittingly, storytelling (Love, 2004; Solorzano & Yosso, 2002) is also an approach used by qualitative researchers who are interested in specifically capturing the stories shared by persons of color. As researchers, we rely on the experiential knowledge of communities of color to interrupt Eurocentric power structures and interrogate the false narratives that have traditionally been perpetuated about communities of color (Love, 2004; Solorzano & Yosso, 2002). This is the approach (storytelling) that we adopted as we embarked upon a journey to better understand the experiences of Wisconsin’s early educators who identify as Black, Hispanic, Native American, and Hmong.  

In 2022, we conducted several individual interviews and focus groups with 45 individuals who were interested in sharing their workforce stories. Prior to meeting with study participants, we were well informed about early education workforce issues and inequities. Nationally, the field offers low wages, limited benefits and requires high demands from its workforce (Whitebook et al., 2018). Study participants confirmed that similar workforce inequities persist in Wisconsin but their reflections also demonstrate how their experiences are multifaceted and shaped by the intersection of their race, class and gender identities. In other words, their experiences are further exacerbated by systemic racism. Study participants shared how racism and discrimination serve as significant challenges for them. They discussed how they face stereotypes and biases based on their racial background which undermines their capabilities and professionalism; they experience microaggressions, or subtle types of racism, in the form of comments or actions that reinforce negative racial stereotypes and undermine their authority; they experience barriers to accessing resources and opportunities that are essential for program viability and career growth; and their voices are smothered in the field, resulting in isolation and exclusion from co-developing policies and practices that reflect equity and diversity. Finally, these Black and Brown professionals discussed how their lived experiences weigh heavily on their psychological well-being and their ability to properly care for the children and families enrolled at their programs.  

The stories shared by Wisconsin’s Black and Brown early educators are important and remind us of how the state of the early education workforce in Wisconsin is in crisis. Black and Brown professionals are essential, not only because they serve as the backbone to Wisconsin’s economic viability (Yellen, 2020), but also because all children regardless of their race and ethnic background benefit from Black and Brown early educator’s experiential knowledge, cultural capital and educational background (Gershenson et al., 2018; Henry, 2017; Warren, 2017). The fact that they experience racial, social, economic and gender marginalization and, yet, remain in the field is a testament to their resilience, dedication and commitment to children and families. Therefore, it is imperative that we – as Wisconsinites – recognize the pertinent workforce challenges that study participants discussed and work diligently to implement effective strategies, policies and practices that mirror equity and  justice for all. As we continue to navigate these challenges we must acknowledge, support and magnify the voices of Black and Brown professionals as part of the change process. Through collaborative efforts, advocacy, and a commitment to equity, we can pave the way for a more inclusive and empowering future for Wisconsin’s Black and Brown providers, children and families. 

Full Executive Summary

Two-Page Overview

References 

Gershenson, S., Hart, C., Hyman, J., Lindsay, C. & Papageorge, N.W. (2018). The long-run impacts of same-race teachers. National Bureau of Economic Research. 

Henry, A. (2017). Culturally relevant pedagogies:  Possibilities and challenges for African Canadian children. Teacher College Records, 119(010302), 1-27.  

Love, B. (2004). Brown plus 50 counter-storytelling:  A critical race theory analysis of the majoritarian achievement gap story. Equity & Excellence in Education, 37, 227-246.  

Pilarz, A. R., Claessens, A., Awkward-Rich, L. & Hoiting, J. (2021). Wisconsin’s early care and education workforce: Summary report on the survey of center-based teachers, pp. 1-57. 

Rigby, E., Ryan, R. & Brooks-Bunn, J. (2007). Child care quality in different state policy contexts. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, 26(4), 887-907.  

Solórzano, D. G., & Yosso, T. J. (2002). Critical race methodology: Counter-storytelling as an analytical framework for education research. Qualitative Inquiry 8(1), 23-44.  

Warren-Grice, A. (2017). Advocacy for equity: Extending culturally relevant pedagogy in predominantly White suburban schools. Teacher College Records, 119(010305), 1-26. 

Whitebook, M., McLean, C., Austin, L. J. E., & Edwards, B. (2018). Early Childhood Workforce Index. Berkeley, CA: University of California, Berkeley, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment. 

Yellen, J. (2020). The history of women’s work and wages and how it has created success for us all. Brookings. https://www.brookings.edu/essay/the-history-of-womens-work-and-wages-and-how-it-has-created-success-for-us-all/ 


La importancia de la investigación cualitativa para promover la equidad en la fuerza laboral de la educación temprana en Wisconsin

Realizado por la Dra. Toshiba Adams, Ph.D.

La educación temprana sienta las bases para el proceso de desarrollo de un niño/a a lo largo de toda su vida (Rigby et al., 2007). Detrás de los coloridos entornos de aprendizaje hay educadores dedicados que dan forma a las mentes de nuestros/as alumnos/as más jóvenes. En Wisconsin, nuestro panorama de la educación infantil es muy diverso, con el 12,6 por ciento de maestros/as de centros y el 28 por ciento de proveedores familiares que se identifican como profesionales negros/as o de color (Pilarz, A. R. et al., 2021) quienes sirven como columnas de fortaleza y sabiduría para los/as niños/as pequeños/as, sus familias y la comunidad en general. Sin embargo, al igual que otras profesiones, educadores de la primera infancia negros y de color experimentan desafíos únicos. En este blog, considero el panorama matizado de la fuerza laboral de educación temprana de Wisconsin y comparto las lecciones clave aprendidas de un estudio de investigación cualitativa (2022) que destaca las experiencias vividas por un segmento de esta fuerza laboral que se identifica como negro, indígena o persona de color (BIPOC, en inglés). Sobre la base de sus sentimientos compartidos, las estructuras de la fuerza laboral de educación temprana de Wisconsin están mezcladas con racismo estructural y otras formas de desigualdades que afectan la movilidad social, económica y política de profesionales negros y de color; satisfacción laboral; retención en el campo; bienestar psicológico; y las interacciones con niños/as y familias.

Para entender mejor sus experiencias, primero necesitábamos escuchar sus historias. La narración de historias es un concepto que tiene sus raíces en la tradición africana y que históricamente se ha utilizado para preservar la cultura, las creencias y los conocimientos de los pueblos africanos. Como corresponde, la narración de historias (Love, 2004; Solórzano y Yosso, 2002) es también un enfoque utilizado por investigadores cualitativos que están interesados en capturar específicamente las historias compartidas por las personas de color. Como investigadores, nos basamos en el conocimiento experiencial de las comunidades de color para interrumpir las estructuras de poder eurocéntricas y cuestionar las falsas narrativas que tradicionalmente se han perpetuado sobre las comunidades de color (Love, 2004; Solórzano y Yosso, 2002). Este es el enfoque (narración de historias) que adoptamos cuando nos embarcamos en un viaje para comprender mejor las experiencias de educadores de la primera infancia de Wisconsin que se identifican como negros/as, hispanos/as, nativos/as americanos/as y hmong.

En 2022, realizamos varias entrevistas individuales y grupos de enfoque con 45 personas interesadas en compartir sus historias laborales. Antes de reunirnos con quienes participaron en el estudio, nos informamos bien sobre los problemas y las desigualdades de la fuerza laboral de la educación temprana. A nivel nacional, el campo ofrece salarios bajos, beneficios limitados y requiere altas demandas de su fuerza laboral (Whitebook et al., 2018). Quienes participaron en el estudio confirmaron que persisten desigualdades laborales similares en Wisconsin, pero sus reflexiones también demuestran cómo sus experiencias son multifacéticas y están moldeadas por la intersección de sus identidades de raza, clase y género. En otras palabras, sus experiencias se ven intensificadas por el racismo sistémico. Quienes participaron en el estudio compartieron cómo el racismo y la discriminación son desafíos importantes para ellos/as. Hablaron de cómo se enfrentan a los estereotipos y prejuicios basados en su origen racial, lo que perjudica sus capacidades y su profesionalismo; experimentan microagresiones, o tipos sutiles de racismo, en forma de comentarios o acciones que refuerzan estereotipos raciales negativos y debilitan su autoridad; experimentan barreras para acceder a recursos y oportunidades que son esenciales para la viabilidad del programa y el crecimiento profesional; y sus voces son minimizadas en el campo, lo que resulta en aislamiento y exclusión del desarrollo conjunto de políticas y prácticas que reflejen la equidad y la diversidad. Finalmente, estos/as profesionales negros/as y de color hablaron sobre cómo sus experiencias vividas pesan mucho en su bienestar psicológico y su capacidad para cuidar adecuadamente a niños/as y familias en sus programas.

Las historias compartidas por educadores de la primera infancia negros/as y de color de Wisconsin son importantes y nos recuerdan cómo el estado de la fuerza laboral de la educación temprana en Wisconsin está en crisis. Los/as profesionales negros/as y de color son esenciales, no solo porque sirven como columna vertebral de la viabilidad económica de Wisconsin (Yellen, 2020), sino también porque todos/as los/as niños/as, independientemente de su raza y origen étnico, se benefician del conocimiento y experiencia, el capital cultural y la formación académica de educadores infantiles negros/as y de color (Gershenson et al., 2018; Enrique, 2017; Warren, 2017). El hecho de que experimenten marginación racial, social, económica y de género y, sin embargo, permanezcan en el campo es un testimonio de su resiliencia, dedicación y compromiso con los/as niños/as y las familias. Por lo tanto, es imperativo que nosotros/as, como habitantes de Wisconsin, reconozcamos los desafíos pertinentes de la fuerza laboral que quienes participaron en el estudio discutieron y trabajemos diligentemente para implementar estrategias, políticas y prácticas efectivas que reflejen la equidad y la justicia. A medida que continuamos navegando por estos desafíos, debemos reconocer, apoyar y engrandecer las voces de profesionales negros/as y de color como parte del proceso de cambio. A través de esfuerzos de colaboración, abogacía y un compromiso con la equidad, podemos allanar el camino para un futuro más inclusivo y empoderador para proveedores, niños/as y familias negras y de color de Wisconsin.

Resumen ejecutivo completo

Descripción general de dos páginas

Referencias

Gershenson, S., Hart, C., Hyman, J., Lindsay, C. & Papageorge, N.W. (2018). The long-run impacts of same-race teachers. National Bureau of Economic Research.

Henry, A. (2017). Culturally relevant pedagogies:  Possibilities and challenges for African Canadian children. Teacher College Records, 119(010302), 1-27.

Love, B. (2004). Brown plus 50 counter-storytelling:  A critical race theory analysis of the majoritarian achievement gap story. Equity & Excellence in Education, 37, 227-246.

Pilarz, A. R., Claessens, A., Awkward-Rich, L. & Hoiting, J. (2021). Wisconsin’s early care and education workforce: Summary report on the survey of center-based teachers, pp. 1-57.

Rigby, E., Ryan, R. & Brooks-Bunn, J. (2007). Child care quality in different state policy contexts. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, 26(4), 887-907.

Solórzano, D. G., & Yosso, T. J. (2002). Critical race methodology: Counter-storytelling as an analytical framework for education research. Qualitative Inquiry 8(1), 23-44.

Warren-Grice, A. (2017). Advocacy for equity: Extending culturally relevant pedagogy in predominantly White suburban schools. Teacher College Records, 119(010305), 1-26.

Whitebook, M., McLean, C., Austin, L. J. E., & Edwards, B. (2018). Early Childhood Workforce Index. Berkeley, CA: University of California, Berkeley, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment.

Yellen, J. (2020). The history of women’s work and wages and how it has created success for us all. Brookings. https://www.brookings.edu/essay/the-history-of-womens-work-and-wages-and-how-it-has-created-success-for-us-all/

*Las referencias se han mantenido en idioma inglés para conservar las citas de manera precisa.

This site is registered on wpml.org as a development site.